Lara Zink

Lara Zink
Co-Founder, Women Funding Women

It was serendipity that brought Lara Zink from Vancouver to the University of Western Ontario (now Western University) and the keen interest she developed in politics in grades 11 and 12 led her to study political science. “I visited a great aunt in London while in high school and thought the Western campus was amazing,” says Lara. 

Lara’s journey, from graduating with an Honours BA degree in political science to working as part of the federal government team that negotiated the NAFTA agreement to a long and successful career in finance, was a non-traditional one. Her experience makes her a role model dedicated to helping women overcome barriers to entry and to ensure that leadership, representation, and gender equity exist within the finance industry.  

Lara’s degree in political science and experience working with the Young Conservatives as a teenager led to a role as political assistant to federal Member of Parliament Michael Wilson, then Minister of International Trade and Industry Canada. “I loved my two years working in Ottawa,” says Lara. “I was able to speak with members of Parliament and their staff about the benefits of NAFTA to Canada and traveled to Washington for the final stages of negotiation of the agreement.”

After two years on Parliament Hill, Lara wrote the GMAT exam and applied to business schools, including the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto where she ultimately earned her MBA. Although she had hoped to return to Vancouver after graduation, job opportunities were more plentiful in Toronto. After considering options in marketing and private wealth, Lara chose to enter a corporate lending training program with RBC in Toronto. She started in business banking and moved to another lending group in RBC’s financial institutions group before embarking on a 20-year career in global equity sales and trading on the trading floor at RBC Capital Markets.

When she left RBC in 2019, Lara paused and considered her next career move. “While exploring job opportunities during the pandemic lockdown, I threw my name in the hat for the position of President and Chief Executive Officer of Women in Capital Markets,” says Lara. She joined WCM, the largest network of women in finance whose mission is to accelerate equity, diversity and inclusion in finance, in 2021. Lara led WCM in developing programs to unite the finance industry in supporting EDI in capital markets and delivering research, programming and strategic value to the organization’s sponsors, members and stakeholders. 

Lara left WCM in September of 2023 to join a woman-led asset management company, Delaney Capital Management, where she currently serves as Vice President of Client Service and Development.

Lara’s commitment to embracing equity and helping women succeed, both in the finance sector and as company founders, is reflected in her role as a member of the board of Canadian Women’s Network, where she will work to help Canadian female founders grow and secure funding. She recently joined Sherry Shannon-Vanstone and Deborah Rosati to create Women Funding Women (WFW), a collective aimed at addressing the persistent funding gap faced by women founders in North America. 

WFW, which will launch on February 7 in Toronto, brings together organizations and resources committed to empowering women, offering gender equality, and catalyzing economic growth by increasing access to seed funding for women-led ventures. Lara’s vast experience in capital markets and her passion for driving change and ensuring women’s success is key to the work that WFW will do to increase access to funding for women founders. 

Lara’s professional success in the finance sector, her belief that strategy and culture differentiate organizations, and her work as a leader and mentor for women – as entrepreneurs, funders and investors – have made her an influential champion for equity, diversity and inclusion, and a powerful initiator of change for women’s access to venture funding.

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Research Spotlight: Technology and Healthcare

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing, affordable virtual reality gaming for home use, AI-enabled home appliances and mRNA vaccines developed in quick response to a global pandemic have become part of daily life.

These technologies are among those revolutionizing the way healthcare is delivered and are giving rise to innovative and productive collaborations between clinicians, biologists, computer scientists and industry.

mRNA Technology

In 2023, the Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded jointly to Katalin Karikó and Drew Weissman for their discoveries that enabled the development of effective mRNA vaccines against COVID-19. As noted by the Nobel Prize organization, “Through their ground-breaking findings, which have fundamentally changed our understanding of how mRNA interacts with our immune system, the laureates contributed to the unprecedented rate of vaccine development during one of the greatest threats to human health in modern times.”

Although messenger RNA, or mRNA, was discovered in the early 1960s and research into how mRNA could be delivered into cells was developed in the 1970s, it wasn’t until 2020, when COVID-19 became a global pandemic, that the first mRNA vaccine was made widely available. Thanks to advances in nanotechnology, where lipid nanoparticles were developed to wrap mRNA and allow entry into cells, the first mRNA vaccines were developed against the Ebola virus. This milestone, combined with decades of research and huge increases in funding released during the pandemic, allowed for the worldwide release of the first mRNA COVID vaccine.

Because mRNA vaccines are made in a lab using easily available materials, these vaccines are developed quickly and can be tested via large-scale clinical trials to demonstrate their safety and effectiveness. These vaccines can also be quickly modified to address new virus variants.

The ability to quickly develop very effective vaccines through the use of mRNA for COVID has spurred the development of additional mRNA vaccines for use in HIV, flu, Zika, rabies and to trigger the immune system to target cancer cells.

Virtual Reality/VR

American computer scientist and visual artist Jaron Lanier coined the term “virtual reality” in 1987.  Lanier and human-computer interaction pioneer Thomas G. Zimmerman left Atari in 1985 to found VPL Research, the first company to sell VR goggles and wired gloves. 

VR provides an immersive sensory experience that digitally simulates environments for applications in entertainment, education, architectural and urban design, engineering and robotics, archaeology and, increasingly, healthcare. Researchers and clinicians are exploring the use of VR to manage psychological and physical conditions including stress, anxiety, depression, dementia, autism, pain management and rehabilitation.

Healthcare providers have sought alternatives to opioids to address chronic pain as opioid addiction and death has become a worldwide crisis. In 2021, the US Food and Drug Administration authorized the marketing of a prescription home-use VR device to manage chronic low back pain.

At the Pain Studies Lab at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Dr. Diane Gromala, Canada Research Chair in Computational Technologies for Transforming Pain, leads a research group that conducts patient-centred research to study, invent and design technology systems for people who live with chronic pain. Systems and techniques employed in clinics and in patients’ homes include immersive virtual reality, immersive games, personal data capture and visualization, physiological sensing, wearable computing and mobile technologies and systems.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), anxiety disorders are the world’s most common mental disorders, affecting 301 million people in 2019.  The WHO predicts that by 2030, mental health conditions will be the leading cause of disease burden worldwide. Anxiety has traditionally been treated by a combination of psychotherapy and medication. Virtual reality is now being integrated with traditional therapies, safely immersing patients in a therapeutic environment to practice mindfulness, paced breathing and calming distraction to cope with anxiety and stress. 

Virtual Reality for Supporting the Treatment of Depression and Anxiety: Scoping Review, a paper by researchers in New Zealand and China published in the peer-reviewed journal JMIR Mental Health in 2021 noted:Most studies demonstrated the use of VR to be effective for supporting the treatment of anxiety or depression in a range of settings and recommended its potential as a tool for use in a clinical environment.”

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

From disease detection and treatment recommendations to drug discovery and patient engagement, AI and machine learning promise to be game changers in healthcare. At the same time, governments around the world are concerned about the risks of AI. Representatives from 28 countries from across the globe including Canada, the UK, the US, Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the EU met in the UK in November 2023 and identified, in the Bletchley Declaration, “the urgent need to understand and collectively manage potential risks through a new joint global effort to ensure that AI is developed and deployed in a safe, responsible way for the benefit of the global community.”

The World Health Organization (WHO) has noted that AI tools have the potential to transform the health sector by strengthening clinical trials, improving medical diagnosis and treatment and enhancing the skills of healthcare professionals. In response to the increasing use of AI for health, the WHO has released a new publication listing key regulatory considerations and emphasizing:

  • the importance of establishing AI systems’ safety and effectiveness;
  • rapidly making appropriate systems available to those who need them; and
  • fostering dialogue among stakeholders, including developers, regulators, manufacturers, health workers, and patients.

Enhancing the reliability and accuracy of AI-enabled diagnosis via complementarity-driven deferral to clinicians, a joint paper by Google DeepMind and Google Research published in Nature Medicine in July 2023, proposes Complementarity-driven Deferral-to-Clinical Workflow (CoDoC), an add-on tool for human-AI collaboration that learns when to trust a predictive AI’s diagnosis or defer to a clinician. CoDoC learns to establish the reliability of a predictive AI model as compared to a clinician’s decision and is designed to be used by non-machine learning experts. 

According to Krishnamurthy Dvijotham and Taylan Cemgil, on behalf of the CoDoC team, “CoDoC is a promising example of how we can harness the benefits of AI in combination with human strengths and expertise. We are working with external partners to rigorously evaluate our research and the system’s potential benefits. To bring technology like CoDoC safely to real-world medical settings, healthcare providers and manufacturers will also have to understand how clinicians interact differently with AI, and validate systems with specific medical AI tools and settings.”

An example of the use of AI to bring information to patients is AskEllyn.ai, which launched last week in Waterloo. The platform uses generative artificial intelligence to help people get answers to their questions about breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. AskEllyn was developed by Ellyn Winters-Robinson, using stories from her book Flat Please – Hold The Shame as the base for its large language model, in collaboration with Pat Belliveau, CEO of Catalyst Entertainment, marketing pro Ryan Burgio and software developer Christian Silvestru. For external resources, Winters-Robinson curated a list of third-party sites that the tool will recommend. Users are able to chat with Ellyn anytime, anywhere, and in any language to ask questions ranging from what to expect from chemotherapy to how to speak with friends and family about a diagnosis.

“AskEllyn is there to answer the thousands of questions patients have that doctors simply don’t have the time to answer,” says Winters-Robinson. She envisions the project as the first instance of Conversation Care, a new kind of healthcare that could include platforms for information about a range of conditions “so that no one diagnosed will ever walk alone,” she says.

Precision Medicine

Precision or personalized medicine is defined by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as “an innovative approach that takes into account individual differences in patients’ genes, environments, and lifestyles.”

This approach to treatment is applied by oncologists to classify cancers into precise types and subtypes and to choose treatments based on the DNA signature of an individual patient’s tumor. Oncologists also use cancer immunotherapy through the use of the patient’s immune system to stop or slow the growth of cancer, stop cancer from spreading to other parts of the body, help the immune system work better to destroy cancer cells and deliver toxins, such as radiation or chemotherapy, directly to cancer cells.

Another form of precision medicine is pharmacogenetics, a field of research at the crossroads of pharmaceuticals and genetics and a rapidly growing field in human genetics. Pharmacogenetics studies how a person’s genes affect how they respond to medications in order to help clinicians prescribe the drugs and doses best suited for each patient. Pharmacogenetics is also expected to contribute to advanced screening for disease, providing people with the opportunity to make lifestyle and environmental changes at an early age in order to avoid or lessen the severity of a genetic disease.

Precision medicine is also emerging as a course for identifying therapies for the 6,000–8,000 identified unique rare diseases, with approximately 80% of those diseases being genetic in origin. According to the paper Rare disease emerging as a global public health priority, published in Frontiers of Public Health in 2022, 3.5–5.9% of the world’s population, which corresponds to 263 to 446 million people worldwide, are affected by rare diseases.

In Canada, All for One, a pan-Canadian initiative, was launched in 2022 to increase access to genome-wide sequencing for diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases. Led by Genome Canada, the initiative provides access to genome-wide sequencing for diagnosis and treatment of life-threatening genetic diseases. A key component of the All for One precision health initiative is the development of a Pan-Canadian Health Data Ecosystem, which connects and leverages genomic data across clinical sites to drive research breakthroughs in order to improve patient care. The ecosystem will enable data sharing between institutions, across jurisdictional boundaries, and between clinical and research settings, serving as a data solution to deliver precision health for rare genetic diseases.

In the US, Vertex Exa-cel therapy, a treatment and potential cure for sickle cell disease has been found safe enough for clinical use and may receive federal approval this year. Sickle cell disease, an illness that afflicts more than 100,000 Americans, affects millions of people worldwide, most of whom have African ancestry. Caused by a gene mutation, the disease results in strokes, organ damage and episodes of severe pain. If approved, this treatment would be the first medicine to treat a genetic disease using CRISPR gene-editing.

Dr. Laura Hopkins 
Gynecologic Oncologist, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency
Professor, College of Medicine, Division of Oncology, University of Saskatchewan 
Provincial Lead for Gynecologic Oncology

Laura Hopkins always knew she wanted to be a doctor. Growing up on a beef cattle farm north of Napanee, Ontario, she enjoyed sewing, knitting and making lace. She attributes her proficiency as a surgeon to the eye-hand coordination she developed doing these crafts.

After completing medical school at the University of Toronto, Laura trained as a resident at McMaster University, where evidence-based medicine was first practiced.  Described as one of the most important medical advances in the past 150 years, evidence-based medicine integrates the best research data with clinical expertise and patient values in order to use the best evidence to give patients the best possible care. Laura wanted to focus on clinical care and loved doing quality assurance projects to answer questions about how patient care could be improved. Her work to acquire evidence on how the use of antibiotics prior to cesarean delivery and the prophylactic prescription of anti-clotting agents for all cancer in-patients improved infection and clot rates was very rewarding – for Laura and for the patients who benefitted from these projects.

Laura sampled the field of electives during her residency and it was an obstetrician-gynecologist who served as the role model that led her to specialize in obstetrics and gynecology.  “She was the first happy doctor I had met,” says Laura. “I never looked back after working with her.” 

Laura was on a path to a career as a generalist obstetrician-gynecologist when she was encouraged to apply for a fellowship in gynecologic oncology. Gynecologic oncologists treat ovarian, cervical, uterine, and vulvar cancers and are a unique class of physicians who not only perform complex surgeries but also work with women through their entire course of treatment, including chemotherapy and palliative support. She was accepted to the program at the University of Toronto and says, “It was the right decision and best choice for me. There is immediate gratification in getting rid of a bad problem for a patient through surgery.”

Laura was recruited to Saskatchewan in September 2019 after 18 years at the Ottawa Hospital and the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa. During her tenure at the University of Ottawa, she published papers, participated in committee work and served as undergraduate director, post-graduate director and division head. After almost two decades of this work, she looked for a change from the focus on medical education and started doing locums, covering for physicians on leave in Halifax and Saskatoon.

In late 2018, Saskatoon lost both of its gynecological oncologists due to exhausting workloads that resulted in burnout. Another resigned in Regina in June 2019, leaving just one permanent gynecological oncologist practicing in Saskatchewan. When the province began recruiting new physicians, Laura expressed interest and was hired as program lead to create a provincial model of care guidelines, quality improvement initiatives and clinical trials. She set up clinical programs in Saskatoon and Regina, and hired five additional gynecological oncologists to staff those programs. She opened clinical trials for women with cancer for the first time in Saskatchewan, achieved the best surgical wait times for gynecologic cancer in Canada, and inaugurated a robotic surgery program. With research funding provided by the federal government, matched by the provincial government and made available through Ovarian Cancer Canada, Laura set up a biobank for ovarian tumor tissue and an academic program.

In September 2023, Laura launched the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency’s first investigator-initiated trial. This is the first pragmatic trial in Canada that will feature patients, oncologists, pathologists and scientists working together to deliver personalized treatment options and improve quality of life. Ovarian cancer patients’ tumors will be tested for mutations that predict response to a new class of drugs, providing accurate, personalized, genomic information about each patient’s tumor and helping patients make informed choices about their care. A total of 100 patients from across Saskatchewan will be enrolled in the 2.5-year trial. “For the first time, we will be able to give ovarian cancer patients very specific information about their chances of responding to treatment,” notes Laura. “When I was in training, we used to talk about “bench to bedside” and cutting-edge care. But I was trained to guess about what chemo drugs were going to work and in what order to administer those drugs. Now we work with scientists who can run a 1,200-drug panel against cancer cells to find the right drugs to kill those cells.”

Laura Hopkins holds nearly $5 million in active research grants spanning surgical quality and safety, precision medicine and new technologies in oncofertility. She is a clinician, educator, researcher and successful leader in building a strong gynecological oncology clinical and research program and team in Saskatchewan. Patient care remains her priority. “My passion is to provide excellent, compassionate, timely care for my patients through all stages of treatment,” she says.

Research Spotlight: Health Informatics

Health Informatics – Digital Health Research and Applications

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a pandemic, sending the world into lockdown. After just over three years, 5 million cases and over 52,000 deaths from COVID-19 confirmed in Canada, the WHO downgraded the pandemic on May 4, 2023, determining that COVID-19 is now an established and ongoing health issue that no longer constitutes a public health emergency of international concern. 

As the country dealt with a record number of hospitalizations, ICU capacity crises, scarcity of PPE for healthcare workers, and ongoing lockdowns, the innovative delivery of healthcare in Canada became vital. In its report, Onward and Upwards, Digital Talent Outlook 2025, ICTC, the Information and Communications Technology Council, notes that Canada has experienced a significant increase in the adoption of digital healthcare since the advent of COVID-19.  And in 2020, the federal government announced an investment of $240.5 million to accelerate the use of virtual tools and digital approaches to support Canadians to meet healthcare needs.

The Canadian Medical Association defines three classes of health technology: virtual care, analysis of large amounts of health data to support diagnoses and treatment decision-making, and the use of technology in the delivery of healthcare. Telehealth services, centralized electronic healthcare records, wearables and sensors, cloud technology, and the use of big data, machine learning, and artificial intelligence are becoming core elements of healthcare in Canada. When lockdowns necessitated virtual care sessions with physicians, visits to doctors’ offices in Ontario declined by almost 80%. Virtual care accounted for 70% of all primary care physician appointments, establishing virtual healthcare as a norm. 

Information and communication technologies are key to the management of all aspects of healthcare, including patient records, laboratory and radiology information systems, physician order entry, and clinical monitoring. And an extraordinary amount of complex data is generated as the health technology sector becomes more digitized. According to the Competition Bureau of Canada, approximately 30% of all data in the world is generated by the healthcare industry. With this expansion of the use of technology and resulting data comes the need for health information users with the expertise to make the best use of the data and ensure its reliability and security.  

The National Institutes of Health Informatics (NIHI), Canada’s first national organization dedicated to fostering Health Informatics innovation, research, and education, notes the need for fundamental and applied research in Health Informatics on “the definition of the content of the electronic health record, mechanisms for deriving, representing, and executing care guidelines, usable technologies for knowledge-guided order entry, effective and usable clinical decision support systems, methods for customizing interactive systems to different user-types and individuals, automated chart extraction, medical literature summarization, and hundreds of other areas.”  Also required are prototypes, effective user interfaces, and an evaluation of the applications of Health Informatics to innovative delivery methods and clinical systems.

At the University of Toronto, the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME) conducts research and offers professional graduate degree programs that focus on evidence-based research in Health Informatics.  The program, which is recognized by the Vector Institute for Artificial Intelligence, offers a professional Master of Health Informatics which provides graduates with expertise in clinical information and communication technologies and prepares health informaticians to bridge the gaps between clinicians and ICT professionals. 

The University of Toronto IHPME research team focuses on topics including the impacts of utilizing technology to transform healthcare delivery, the role of digital health in improving health outcomes, workflow, and process design, clinical decision support using AI and machine learning, data-driven personalized medicine, ubiquitous sensors and the design of health technologies.

At the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary, the Centre for Health Informatics (CHI) research and innovation centre was launched in 2018 to improve health and healthcare through data-driven innovation and collaborative research. Research within CHI focuses on the development of efficient and accurate handling of digital health data for personalized disease prevention and treatment and the identification of comorbidities and adverse events in electronic medical record (EMR) data. Researchers are also working to use linked data to develop a clinical decision support tool to both reduce heart failure hospital readmissions and predict readmission for heart failure patients. And CHI researchers with expertise in qualitative data analysis and natural language processing are developing methods to automate qualitative analysis of large amounts of free text data, including patient interviews.

Carleton University’s Department of Health Sciences was founded to conduct interdisciplinary research via the integration of knowledge and methods from across disciplines, including biomedicine, mathematics, and environmental and political sciences. Researchers from across fields of expertise work together on three main research themes: life course approach to health, environmental and global health, and big data. The department’s Science, Technology and Policy program, designed to meet a growing need for interdisciplinary health research, and skills in knowledge translation and data analysis, provides graduate students with the opportunity to conduct major research projects to develop solutions to critical and timely issues like health care for rural communities and the development and deployment of vaccines.

Health Informatics is one of the research focus areas of the School of Public Health Sciences at the University of Waterloo. Researchers with expertise in statistics, engineering, the social sciences, rehabilitation science, mathematics, and computer science work to develop and use information and communication technologies to support and advance individual and community health.

In the school’s Ubiquitous Health Technology Lab (UbiLab), the research team studies wearables and zero-effort sensors for remote patient monitoring, the use of IoT (Internet of Things) technology for large-scale, population-level studies and the use of big data, AI, and health data analytics to evaluate the technology. The Professional Practice Centre in Health Systems works with client partners, including major teaching hospitals, community hospitals, public health units, community-based agencies, physician groups, pharmacies, government agencies, and NGOs on real-world health information technology problems. Projects have included the design and implementation of a pharmacy nomenclature standardization program, the implementation of an information system to automate data extraction and reporting, the creation of a data migration strategy and specification for a major hospital information system, and the prototyping of medical devices and applications.

As Canada’s population ages, with those aged 85 and older being one of the fastest-growing groups, the research conducted in the school’s Aging and Innovation Research Program (AIRP) becomes more relevant. AIRP research focuses on the acceptance and adoption of innovations, including technologies for the assessment and management of risks of going missing in persons living with dementia, by older adults, their care partners, and healthcare professionals. The goal of this work is the development, application, and evaluation of strategies to advance dementia-friendly communities.

Canada Health Infoway, an independent, not-for-profit organization established and funded by the Canadian federal government, works with governments, healthcare organizations, clinicians, and patients to make healthcare more digital. The organization’s goal of ensuring that all Canadians have online access to personal health information, test results, prescriptions, and appointment booking services are central to ensuring that technology is as transformative to the country’s health system as it has been to all other aspects of daily life. Digital health initiatives include collaborative projects on virtual care, accessibility of health information, e-prescribing, standards in patient record data, privacy and security, and the adoption and use of innovative technologies.

COVID-19 highlighted issues in collecting, sharing, and using health data to help public health officials provide advice and information during public health emergencies. The rapid growth of cross-disciplinary research and innovation in health informatics and the adoption and use of digital technologies in healthcare are leading to improved access to healthcare, more accurate and timely diagnoses and treatments, and meaningful improvements in the quality of care.

Researcher Spotlight: Helen Chen

Dr. Helen Chen
Professor of Practice and Director
Professional Practice Centre

Health care is evolving, and health informatics is at the forefront of the transformation. Health informatics combines communication, information technology, and health care and is used for vital functions that range from sharing information to personalizing medicine. With effective use, health informatics has the potential to vastly improve patient care.

Dr. Helen Chen is the Professor of Practice and the Director of the Professional Practice Centre with a cross-appointment at the School of Public Health Sciences and with a cross-appointment at the Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo.  Dr. Chen teaches courses related to health informatics, information system design and management, health data standards, and health data analytics.

The Professional Practice Centre provides experiential learning opportunities for students of the professional graduate programs within the School of Public Health Sciences. By working with healthcare sector partners as well as professional staff and faculty from the University of Waterloo, the centre tackles challenging and important real-world problems.

“Working closely with industry is in my blood. I want to see the tangible impact of the research,” says Dr. Chen. Her education includes a BA and MS in Engineer Mechanics from Tsinghua University in Beijing and a Ph.D. in Computational Biomechanics from the University of Waterloo. It was a position sponsored by Agfa HealthCare that brought Dr. Chen to her current role at the University of Waterloo.

Dr. Chen’s research focuses on health data quality and analytics, health information system integration and interoperability, healthcare decision support, and Machine Learning and AI in Public Health, which is a perfect complement to the work she leads at the Professional Practice Centre.

In many ways, the centre acts like a consulting firm where students and faculty offer their expertise to health organizations and hospitals to solve problems. The organization can choose to hire a student directly to work on a specific issue or can hire the centre to manage the entire project. With the experience of working on a large project, combined with a professional degree, students gain an upper hand as they enter or return to industry.

“After they finish a project, students may be hired by the organization to continue the work. This experience makes them highly employable. The collaborative environment is extremely good for our students to learn. For our partners, they have an opportunity to experiment and take on problems they may not have the resources or expertise to tackle on their own at a significantly lower price than working with a large consulting firm.”

In one example, the centre worked with the Ontario Health Team to create its digital transformation roadmap.

“The Professional Practice Centre pulled in 10 students and 2 professors to work on the project. We were able to help them generate the inventory of their digital assets, identify information and technology gaps, and create the digital transformation roadmap, which has helped them move to the next stage of the project,” Chen said.

In healthcare, digital transformation is a continuous pursuit as technology and the need for quality and secure information increases. As health informatics moves into the area of advanced analytics, the need for specialized expertise will only increase. Fortunately, research and programs like the one offered by the School of Public Health Sciences and the Professional Practice Centre in Health Systems are seeing an increase in funding and demand in both the healthcare industry and the student population. These factors will play an important role as health organizations and students prepare for the future.